Category

Europe

LINX Upgrades Equipment at VIRTUS LONDON2 to Enable Growth & 100G Connections

By | Digital Britain, Europe, General, LINX News, News

Due to increased member and capacity demands, the London Internet Exchange are pleased to announce considerable port upgrades to their VIRTUS Data Centre peering location.

 

VIRTUS’ LONDON2 facility in Hayes joined LINX back in 2014 as an accessible (virtual) data centre facility, being upgraded then in 2016 to a ConneXions Access Point following member demand and LINX infrastructure being installed. A LINX ConneXions Access Point is based at a neutral data centre giving customers direct access to LINX infrastructure from within the data centre, thus improving performance of its peering connectivity.

Photograph features LINX Head of Sales, Jennifer Holmes
with
Kelly Scott, VIRTUS Account Director (Education)

Darren Watkins, Managing Director from VIRTUS Data Centres is pleased with the partnership and new upgrade:

Connectivity is key to the success of data centres and we are delighted that LINX has increased its capability for our customers at LONDON2. This industry critical peering service compliments our Cloud Connect services making LONDON2 a key hub for technology.

VIRTUS customers who become LINX members will also benefit from improved latency and resilience as well as transit performance and routing control. Increased capacity and redundancy at a lower cost are also key benefits to joining an Internet exchange such as LINX. The customers have the opportunity to peer with over 880 LINX member networks from over 80 countries worldwide across the dual LAN infrastructure in London, LON1 (Juniper) and LON2 (Edgecore Networks & IP Infusion).

LINX Head of Sales Jennifer Holmes says:

“We’re extremely pleased with the level of interest from new and existing members in connecting at the Virtus Hayes site. Our recent upgrade of equipment at this location allows networks to not only connect to our peering fabric in London but also gives them the option of larger port sizes and increased capacity – this is sure to encourage even more growth in the future.”

European Parliament passes controversial Copyright Directive

By | EU Legislation, Europe, News

The European parliament has voted in favour of controversial proposals to reform online copyright. The two most controversial articles in the proposed copyright directive, article 11 and article 13, had been amended after being rejected by MEPs when they voted on the draft legislation in July.

Article 11, which has been dubbed the “link tax” by critics, would require news aggregation and search sites such as Google to pay publishers for showing news snippets or linking to news stories on other sites. Article 11 has now been amended to allow links to contain individual words from the linked to publishers’ content in a bid to address criticism that it would criminalise the use of hyperlinks.

Article 13 would require companies to automatically filter copyrighted material uploaded on their platforms, unless it has been specifically licensed. The amended proposals have reduced the scope of article 13 to platforms that both host “significant” amounts of content and also “promote” that content, and an exemption is made for small businesses.

A large number of musicians, including Paul McCartney, backed the proposals in article 13 arguing that they would ensure artists were appropriately compensated for their work. However, an open letter signed by 70 technology leaders, including Tim Berners-Lee, warned that the proposals were an “imminent threat” to the future of the internet as we know it, and could effectively ban things like memes and remixes which use some copyrighted material.

While recorded entertainment industries welcomed the vote,  critics say that the two articles have only been subject to cosmetic changes, which have done nothing to mitigate their concerns.

The legislation will now be subject to trialogue negotiations with the European commission and Member States through the European Council. It will then return for a final vote in the European parliament in January.

EU to spend €120m to extend free Wifi across Union

By | EU Legislation, Europe, News
The EU has announced it will spend €120 million to extend Wifi across 6,000 to 8,000 municipalities, bringing Wifi to “every European village and every city” with free Wifi by 2020. 

The scheme, dubbed WiFi4EU, is described by the European Commission as having the aim to “increase accessibility to high-performance mobile internet, and to raise awareness of the benefits of such connectivity.”

The action falls under the framework of the digital single market and the desire to make customers’ experience across the EU the same.

You can find more information about the initiative here.

EU to impose national quotas on streaming services

By | EU Legislation, Europe, News
The EU is to impose national quotas on streaming services.

The EU is currently considering imposing a quota on streaming services, such as Netflix and Amazon Prime, to feature a minimum quantity of European works in their catalogues. The European Parliament has proposed a requirement of 30%, an increase on the European Commission’s proposal of 20%. The quota will be implemented as an amendment to the Audiovisual Media Services directive, which will likely be extended to include social media and any streaming on-demand service.

Colin Bortner, director of public policy for Netflix, argues that the quotas will result in lower quality work. One unnamed diplomat who opposed the measure said that there is a risk the directive will drift away from its original purpose and will move to policing “any moving picture on any screen”.

The quota is currently going through the ordinary legislative procedure, in which the Council of Ministers will also decide its own view, prior to the final outcome being negotiated between the three institutions in a process known as “trialogue”.