Skip to main content

Leaked documents according to the Daily Mail and Wikileaks reveal that CIA has hacked Wi-Fi routers

Posted by Babatunde Onabajo on Tuesday, June 20th, 2017 at 11:15

Leaked documents from Wikileaks and as reported by the Daily Mail show that the CIA has hacked into a number of Wi-Fi routers. 

Leaked documents according to the Daily Mail and Wikileaks reveal that CIA has hacked Wi-Fi routers

Leaked documents from activist group Wikileaks and as reported by the Daily Mail has shown that the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) has hacked a number of routers and has converted them into devices used to snoop in on people’s conversations. The Daily Mail reports that the hacks have targeted 25 router models from manufacturers such as Linksys, DLink and Belkin. Furthermore, the Daily Mail cites the Wikileaks document as stating that the firmware could be expanded to affect a hundred or more devices if they are given only slight modifications.

 

The 175-page document was reportedly nicknamed “CherryBlossom” (CB for short) by the intelligence agency. The document described CherryBlossom as stating that: “The Cherry Blossom (CB) system provides a means of monitoring the internet activity of and performing software exploits on targets of interest”.

 

The firmware apparently works by converting the router into a “FlyTrap” that sends messages also known as “beacons” to CIA-controlled server nicknamed “CherryTree”. The FlyTrap sends information such as the router’s device and security information, which CherryTree logs into a database.

 

Devices that were protected with a weak or default password were highly susceptible to the firmware, the document from Wikileaks show.

 

The findings, if true, show the various problems associated with friendly governments taking the view that it is acceptable for intelligence agencies to compromise either security or privacy. The end result can only be the use of such mechanisms by actors with less than noble intentions – ranging from hostile governments to organised criminals to terrorists all the way down to script kiddies. This serves as a useful forewarning on the dangers of requiring ‘backdoors’ on encryption technology, together with the policy ramifications from the Investigatory Powers Act Technical Capability Notices. 

With over 770 members connecting from over 76 different countries worldwide, LINX members have access to direct routes from a large number of diverse international peering partners.

© London Internet Exchange, 2018 Registered office: London Internet Exchange Limited, 2nd Floor, Trinity Court, Trinity Street, Peterborough PE1 1DA United Kingdom . Registered in England, Number: 3137929
VAT Registration Number: GB 665 9580 82 Head office main telephone number Telephone: +44 (0)1733 207700 Fax: +44 (0)1733 207729

Web Design by Web Design by Bluestorm Design & Marketing

Leave Feedback

Cookies

This site uses cookies to store information on your computer. Some of these cookies are essential to make our site work and have already been set. By using our site you accept the terms of our Privacy Policy.

×