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critical infrastructure Archives - LINX

LINX publishes 2018 Annual Report at LINX105 member conference in London

By | LINX News

The London Internet Exchange (LINX) officially published its 2018 annual report and accounts at the exchange’s annual general meeting on the 29th May.

The new document features an introduction from LINX Chairman Simon Woodhead, who was separately re-elected to LINX Board during the AGM. Simon had recently taken over as Chair from Murray Steele, who had served as LINX Chair for the previous three years.

“Murray made a strong contribution to LINX, especially by lending his expertise in corporate governance to modernise the Board’s structure and working practices. He helped make the Board much more effective, both as a guardian of the membership’s interests and as a supervisor of the executive team, and we are very thankful for his contribution.”

Simon Woodhead, LINX Chairman

Adding Value and Creating Opportunities

2018 was a landmark year where technical innovation, changes in governance and a focussed marketing strategy combined to enhance LINX’s position as a world leading Internet Exchange Point. On the network side the disaggregated LON2 network infrastructure was introduced with all members migrated seamlessly.

LINX added 141 new 10GE ports and 40 new 100GE ports across all the LINX exchanges during 2018. One of these 100GE ports was the second such port to go live in Manchester, which is very encouraging and a sign of the growth we have seen across all LINX networks.

Also in the report LINX Chief Finance Officer, Malcolm Holt, gave a overview of LINX’s financial position. Despite cuts to the prices of LINX services, LINX managed to maintain its revenue levels and contain expenditure growth and this resulted in the reporting of a small surplus. As a not-for-profit member run organisation this puts LINX position for 2019 and beyond.

In summary LINX Chief Executive Officer, John Souter, reflected on a great 12 months for LINX but also looked ahead to some exciting new projects.

“I would like to say how proud I am of our staff, and the great commitment that they show to serving a membership organisation such as LINX. They have enthusiastically embraced an agile way of working across almost everything that they do, and I see improvement projects underway in almost every aspect of working life at LINX. Long may it continue!”

John Souter, LINX Chief Executive Officer

Download 2018 Annual Report

UK to tighten takeover rules to protect national security

By | News, Security
The UK Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) has published a Green Paper with plans to bolster government powers to intervene in corporate mergers and takeovers involving high-tech goods and services to protect national security, and is consulting on what other powers it might need.
In the short term, the government will reduce the turnover threshold that limits its existing powers to intervene in corporate takeovers. At the moment, the Competition and Markets Authority powers only apply to takeovers where the target company has a turnover of at least £70m per year. For companies producing goods and services for military use, or “dual-use” technologies that can be used for military purposes, this is to be reduced to cover any company with a turnover in excess of £1 million. It will also reduce the takeover threshold to £1million turnover per annum for companies involved in the creation, design or support of “multi-purpose computing hardware” and quantum-based technology.
 
In the longer term, the government is looking at a range of options, including

  • extending existing powers to intervene in corporate takeovers, so that they would also apply to new projects, the acquisition of land near sensitive locations, and the sale of “bare assets” (e.g. equipment, intellectual property, or divisions of a business) not involving the sale of the entire company; and
  • creating a mandatory obligation on companies to notify the Competition and Markets Authority when they are targetted for takeover.

The deadline for commenting on the changes to takeover thresholds is 14th November 2017, and for the longer term reforms is 9th January 2018.

UK Government launches consultation on implementing NIS Directive

By | EU Legislation, News, Security

The UK Government has launched a consultation on its plans to implement the Security of Network and Information Systems Directive (“NIS Directive”). The NIS Directive was adopted by the European Parliament on 6 July 2016 and Member States have until 9 May 2018 to transpose the Directive into domestic legislation. The Government has emphasised that it supports the overall aim of the NIS Directive and that its intention is that this legislation will continue to apply in the UK even after the UK has left the EU.

The NIS Directive imposes obligations on two groups of businesses: “operators of essential services” and digital service providers. However, it does not affect network providers as they are already subject to similar obligations in the UK under Section 105 of the Communications Act 2003.

Under the Directive, operators of essential services including those in the energy, transport, water, healthcare and digital infrastructure sectors will have to take “appropriate and proportionate” security measures to manage the risks to their network and information systems. Operators of essential services will also be required to notify serious incidents to the relevant authority.

Key digital service providers (search engines, cloud computing services and online marketplaces) will also have to comply with the security and incident notification requirements established under the Directive.

Organisations who fall in scope of the Directive will be required to develop a strategy and policies to understand and manage their risk; to implement security measures to prevent attacks or system failures, including measures to detect attacks, develop security monitoring, and to raise staff awareness and training; to report incidents as soon as they happen; and to have systems in place to ensure that they can recover quickly after an event, with the capability to respond and restore systems. The Government has stated that “any operator who takes cyber security seriously should already have such measures in place.”

Organisations who fail to implement effective security measures could be fined as much as £17 million or 4 per cent of global turnover. The Government has said, however, that fines would be a last resort, and will not apply to operators that have “assessed the risks adequately, taken appropriate security measures, and engaged with competent authorities but still suffered an attack.”

The NIS Directive relates to loss of service rather than loss of data, which falls under the General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR).

The consultation closes on 30 September 2017.

For more information, see: Consultation on the Security of Network and Information Systems Directive